Change in care hours, cost, and functional independence following continence and assistive technology intervention in an acquired brain injury population

Hayley Jackson, Georgina Mann, Angelita Martini, Lakkhina Troeung, Katie Beros, Annelize Prinsloo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: After acquired brain injury (ABI) dependence on intervention for continence management is common. This preliminary investigation aimed to (i) quantify toileting care hours and costs in a community-based ABI rehabilitation and disability setting, and (ii) measure change in care needs, costs, and functional independence after intervention with assistive technologies (ATs). Method: Pragmatic pre-post intervention pilot study of 14 adults with ABI and toileting disability accessing community-based neurorehabilitation or disability support in Western Australia. Toileting and functional independence were assessed monthly from baseline (T 0) to 3-month follow-up (T 3). Basic and nursing care hours (Northwick Park Dependency Score), cost of care estimates (Northwick Park Care Needs Assessment), functional independence (Functional Independence and Assessment Measure), and cost of consumables were examined pre- and post-intervention with ATs. Multilevel mixed-effects models with bootstrap estimation were conducted. Results: Cost of consumables significantly declined (AU$69/week), and functional independence significantly improved following intervention (+23.5 points). There was a non-significant reduction in care needs for toileting (4 h/week) and in the cost of toileting care (AU$633/week). Conclusion: Toileting disability substantially impacts care hours and costs. This study provides preliminary evidence that comprehensive continence management is beneficial in reducing costs and supporting people with an ABI to increase their independence.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION A comprehensive continence assessment and management plan reduces the number of care hours, cost of care, and cost of continence products in a neurorehabilitation and disability support sample for people with acquired brain injury (ABI). Assistive technologies for continence management are beneficial in supporting people with ABI to increase independence, and reduce costs. Providing comprehensive continence assessment and management plan reduces reliance on staff for continence care, and improves functional independence.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Early online date20 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Apr 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • assistive technology
  • Brain injury
  • continence
  • disability
  • rehabilitation
  • toileting

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