Characteristics associated with differences in 24-hour device-measured and self-reported sleep, sedentary behaviour and physical activity in a sample of Australian primary school children.

Joshua Gauci, Timothy Olds, Carol Maher, Amanda Machell, Francois Fraysse, Mason Munzberg, Dot Dumuid, Isaac Hoepfl

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Abstract

Background How much time children spend sleeping, being sedentary and participating in physical activity affects their health and well-being. To provide accurate guidelines for children’s time use, it is important to understand the differences between device-measured and self-reported use-of-time measures, and what may influence these differences. Among Australian primary school aged children, this study aimed to describe the differences between device measured and self-reported sleep, sedentary behaviour, light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and moderatevigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), and to explore how sociodemographic and personal characteristics were associated with these differences.

Methods Participants (n=120, 67% female, age 9–11 years) were drawn from the Life on Holidays cohort study. Device measured use of time was from 7-day accelerometry worn over five timepoints in a 2-year period, and selfreported use of time was from 2-day Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults (MARCA), conducted at the same timepoints. For each participant and measurement method, average daily time spent in sleep, sedentary time, LPA and MVPA was derived for any overlapping days (that had both types of measurement) across the study period. Participant characteristics were either obtained from baseline parental survey (age, sex, parental education, puberty) or derived from the average of direct measurements across the study timepoints (aerobic fitness from shuttle run, body mass index from anthropometric measurements, academic performance from national standardised tests). Differences between device-measured and self-reported use of time were described using Bland-Altmann plots. Compositional outcome linear-regression models were used to determine which participant characteristics were associated with differences by use-of-time measurement type.
Original languageEnglish
Article number14
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Activity, Sedentary and Sleep Behaviors
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2023
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Sleep
  • Sedentary Behaviour
  • Physical Activity
  • Primary School Children

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