Characteristics, supports, and quality of life of Irish adults with intellectual disability in life-sharing residential communities

Aine Fahey, Patricia Noonan Walsh, Eric Emerson, Suzanne Guerin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BackgroundFew empirical studies have compared quality and outcomes for residents with intellectual disability across intentional communities such as those organised by the Camphill communities in Ireland. MethodUsing a multi-element research protocol developed for an earlier large study, data were gathered about the characteristics of N29 participants living in life-sharing residences organised by Camphill, management procedures, and outcomes for residents. Comparable data were available for N125 adults in group homes or campus residences. ResultsCamphill residents reported a smaller size of household, higher staffing ratios, homely living areas, low levels of institutionalised practices such as social distance, reciprocal relationships with houseparents, and well-developed management procedures, as well as less choice, but were not found to be better on a range of other objective measures. ConclusionAlthough modest in scale, present findings suggest that the value of applying distinctive benefits of life-sharing communities in more typical residential settings for people with intellectual disability should be investigated further to inform current policy debates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-76
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • communities
  • life-sharing
  • residential
  • supports

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