Characterization of dissolved organic matter for prediction of trihalomethane formation potential in surface and sub-surface waters

John Awad, John van Leeuwen, Christopher Chow, Mary Drikas, Ronald Smernik, David Chittleborough, Erick Bestland

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters used for drinking purposes, can vary markedly in character dependent on their sources within catchments. The character of DOM further influences the formation of disinfection by products when precursor DOM present in drinking water reacts with chlorine during disinfection. Here we report the development of models that describe the formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMFP) dependent on the character of DOM in waters from discrete catchments with specific land-use and soil textures. DOM was characterized based on UV absorbance at 254 nm, apparent molecular weight and relative abundances of protein-like and humic-like compounds. DOM character and Br concentration (up to 0.5 mg/L) were used as variables in models (R2 7> 0.93) of THMFP, which ranged from 19 to 649 μg/L. Chloroform concentration (12 - 594 μg/L) and relative abundance (27 - 99%) were first modeled (R2 > 0.85) and from these, the abundances of bromodichloromethane and chlorodibromomethane estimated using power and exponential functions, respectively (R2 > 0.98). From these, the abundance of bromoform is calculated. The proposed model may be used in risk assessment of catchment factors on formation of trihalomethanes in drinking water, in context of treatment efficiency for removal of organic matter.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)430-439
    Number of pages10
    JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
    Volume308
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 5 May 2016

    Keywords

    • Catchment runoff
    • DOM character
    • THMFP

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Characterization of dissolved organic matter for prediction of trihalomethane formation potential in surface and sub-surface waters'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this