Childhood sleep health and epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses

David Balfour, Phillip E. Melton, Joanne A. McVeigh, Rae Chi Huang, Peter R. Eastwood, Sian Wanstall, Amy C. Reynolds, Sarah Cohen-Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aim: Investigate if childhood measures of sleep health are associated with epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence.

Methods: Parent-reported sleep trajectories from age 5 to 17, self-reported sleep problems at age 17, and six measures of epigenetic age acceleration at age 17 were studied in 1192 young Australians from the Raine Study Gen2. 

Results: There was no evidence for a relationship between the parent-reported sleep trajectories and epigenetic age acceleration (p ≥ 0.17). There was a positive cross-sectional relationship between self-reported sleep problem score and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration at age 17 (b = 0.14, p = 0.04), which was attenuated after controlling for depressive symptom score at the same age (b = 0.08, p = 0.34). Follow-up analyses suggested this finding may represent greater overtiredness and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration in adolescents with higher depressive symptoms. 

Conclusion: There was no evidence for a relationship between self- or parent-reported sleep health and epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence after adjusting for depressive symptoms. Mental health should be considered as a potential confounding variable in future research on sleep and epigenetic age acceleration, particularly if subjective measures of sleep are used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1001-1010
Number of pages10
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume112
Issue number5
Early online date20 Feb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • biological age
  • childhood
  • DNA methylation
  • methylation age
  • the Raine Study

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Childhood sleep health and epigenetic age acceleration in late adolescence: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this