Children’s Participation in Child Protection Practice in Ghana: Practitioners’ Recommendations for Practice

Ebenezer Cudjoe, Alhassan Abdullah, Aniceta Aranzanso Chua

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) includes provisions to ensure that children and young people participate in decisions affecting their lives. Ghana ratified the convention in 1990 making a commitment to review its child protection policies and legislation in compliance with provisions in the UNCRC. Yet, national policies and legislation do not include practical guidelines to promote children’s participation in the child protection process. Thus, this qualitative study presents findings from in-depth interviews with 15 child protection practitioners on their views about some practical guidelines to promote children’s participation in child protection. Data from the interviews were subjected to constructivist grounded theory analysis. The study findings revealed the age of the child, separate room for children, creating a friendly environment and education as some important factors for practitioners to consider in promoting participatory practices for children. Child protection policies and legislation in Ghana should include these suggestions to ensure that children’s views are heard in the child protection process. To realize the overarching goal of achieving active child participation in child protection, further research may focus on the views of parents and children on how to develop culturally relevant strategies to promote child participation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)462-474
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Social Service Research
Volume46
Issue number4
Early online date16 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Child protection
  • children’s participation
  • decision-making
  • Ghana
  • practitioners

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