Chinese export porcelain from the wreck of the Sydney Cove (1797)

Mark Staniforth, Mike Nash

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

    Abstract

    British colonisation of Australia during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries saw the establishment of settlements which were almost totally dependent on external sources for their material culture. The Australian colonists did not live in isolation from the rest of the world rather than the supply of 'colonists' (primarily from Great Britain), the flow of capital and the importation of material culture from a variety of sources was an ongoing process (Borrie 1989:119-120). The regular and sustained importation of goods not only made colonial life comfortable but also made life possible.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationGundaroo, NSW
    PublisherThe Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology
    Number of pages46
    ISBN (Print)187549524X
    Publication statusPublished - 1998

    Publication series

    NameSpecial publication / Australian Institute for Maritime Archaeology
    No.12

    Keywords

    • Shipwrecks
    • Sydney Cove
    • China trade porcelain
    • Porcelain, Chinese
    • Underwater archaeology
    • Furneaux Islands
    • Tasmania

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