Clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of community-based management of chronic hepatitis C: a mixed methods systematic review protocol

Davoud Pourmarzi, Lisa Hall, Tony Rahman, Chee Lim, Gerard FitzGerald

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Review question/objective: The current mixed methods review aims to develop an aggregated synthesis of quantitative, qualitative and economic systematic evidence on chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection management intervention delivered in community settings so as to gain an increased understanding of the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of community-based chronic HCV management. This review will contribute to the development of a community-based chronic HCV intervention and inform clinical practice and policy discussion. The overarching question is: What is the clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of communitybased programs for chronic HCV management? The sub-questions to be addressed in the review are: What is the clinical effectiveness (proportion of antiviral treatment completion and sustained virologic response) of the community-based chronic HCV management programs? What is the acceptability (treatment uptake, adherence, engagement and satisfaction) of community-based chronic HCV management programs from the perspective of involved patients? How are the models funded and are they cost-effective? What are the organizational and operational elements of the models of community-based chronic HCV management?

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)914-931
    Number of pages18
    JournalJBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
    Volume15
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2017

    Keywords

    • Health care
    • Hepatitis C
    • Mixed methods
    • Primary health care

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