Clinical effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation and barriers to completion in patients of low socioeconomic status in rural areas: A mixed-methods study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate cardiac rehabilitation utilisation and effectiveness, factors, needs and barriers associated with non-completion. 

Design: We used the mixed-methods design with concurrent triangulation of a retrospective cohort and a qualitative study. 

Setting: Economically disadvantaged areas in rural Australia. 

Participants: Patients (≥18 years) referred to cardiac rehabilitation through a central referral system and living in rural areas of low socioeconomic status. 

Main measures: A Cox survival model balanced by inverse probability weighting was used to assess the association between cardiac rehabilitation utilization and 12-month mortality/cardiovascular readmissions. Associations with non-completion were tested by logistic regression. Barriers and needs to cardiac rehabilitation completion were investigated through a thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n = 28). 

Results: Among 16,159 eligible separations, 44.3% were referred, and 11.2% completed cardiac rehabilitation. Completing programme (HR 0.65; 95%CI 0.57–0.74; p < 0.001) led to a lower risk of cardiovascular readmission/death. Living alone (OR 1.38; 95%CI 1.00–1.89; p = 0.048), having diabetes (OR 1.48; 95%CI 1.02–2.13; p = 0.037), or having depression (OR 1.54; 95%CI 1.14–2.08; p = 0.005), were associated with a higher risk of non-completion whereas enrolment in a telehealth programme was associated with a lower risk of non-completion (OR 0.26; 95%CI 0.18–0.38; p < 0.001). Themes related to logistic issues, social support, transition of care challenges, lack of care integration, and of person-centeredness emerged as barriers to completion. 

Conclusions: Cardiac rehabilitation completion was low but effective in reducing mortality/cardiovascular readmissions. Understanding and addressing barriers and needs through mixed methods can help tailor cardiac rehabilitation programmes to vulnerable populations and improve completion and outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-854
Number of pages18
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume38
Issue number6
Early online date17 Apr 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2024

Keywords

  • cardiac rehabilitation
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • low socioeconomic status
  • morbidity and mortality
  • rural populations

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical effectiveness of cardiac rehabilitation and barriers to completion in patients of low socioeconomic status in rural areas: A mixed-methods study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this