Clinical practice guideline recommendations for the management of challenging behaviours after traumatic brain injury in acute hospital and inpatient rehabilitation settings: a systematic review

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Clinical practice guideline (CPG) recommendations for the management of challenging behaviours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in hospital and inpatient rehabilitation settings are sparse. This systematic review aims to identify and appraise CPGs, and report high-quality recommendations for challenging behaviours after TBI in hospital and rehabilitation settings. 

Materials and methods: A three-step search strategy was conducted to identify CPGs that met inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently scored the AGREE II domains. Guideline quality was assessed based on CPGs adequately addressing four out of the six AGREE II domains. Data extraction was performed with a compilation of high-quality CPG recommendations. 

Results: Seven CPGs out of 408 identified records met the inclusion criteria. Two CPGs were deemed high-quality. High-quality CPG recommendations with the strongest supporting evidence include behaviour management plans; beta-blockers for the treatment of aggression; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for moderate agitation; adamantanes for impaired arousal/attention in agitation; specialised, multi-disciplinary TBI behaviour management services. 

Conclusions: This systematic review identified and appraised the quality of CPGs relating to the management of challenging behaviours after TBI in acute hospital and rehabilitation settings. Further research to rigorously evaluate TBI behaviour management programs, investigation of evidence-practice gaps, and implementation strategies for adopting CPG recommendations into practice is needed.

Implications for rehabilitation 

Two clinical practice guidelines appraised as high-quality outline recommendations for the management of challenging behaviours after traumatic brain injury in hospital and inpatient rehabilitation settings. 

High-quality guideline recommendations with the strongest supporting evidence for non-pharmacological treatment include behaviour management plans considering precipitating factors, antecedents, and reinforcing events. 

High-quality guideline recommendations with the strongest supporting evidence for pharmacological management include beta blockers for aggression in traumatic brain injury. 

Few guidelines provide comprehensive detail on the implementation of recommendations into clinical care which may limit adoption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-463
Number of pages11
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume46
Issue number3
Early online date24 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Keywords

  • behaviour rehabilitation
  • challenging behaviour
  • clinical practice guidelines
  • evidence
  • implementation
  • Traumatic brain injury

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