Clinician modifiable factors associated with better quality of life in children with acquired brain injury undergoing rehabilitation

Tim Connell, Julia Paterson, Rachel Roberts, Parimala Raghavendra, Michael Sawyer, Remo Russo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To identify clinician-modifiable factors related to quality of life (QOL) in children with acquired brain injury (ABI). Participants and methods: Thirty-nine children attending an ABI rehabilitation program (5–18 years) were assessed using the Personality Inventory for Children-2, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-2, Handicap-Related Problems for Parents Inventory and Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory was completed by children and parents six months later. Results: Children with lower levels of internalising and externalising behaviours, health and social skill problems, and higher family functioning had significantly higher levels of total QOL (child and parent rated) (r = −.47 to −.79). In addition, children with higher levels of adaptive behaviour had significantly higher parent rated total QOL (r =.46). Measures of mother’s stressors had moderate but not statistically significant relationships with the child’s total QOL (r = −.31 to −.35). There were moderate and statistically significant relationships between measures of participation in physical activities and total QOL as rated by children (r =.42–.48) but not parents (r =.11–.30). Conclusions: These findings suggest potential targets to be investigated in future clinical research in rehabilitation following ABI in children to optimise QOL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-430
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Injury
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • activities of daily living
  • externalising behaviour
  • internalising behaviour
  • outcome
  • Participation
  • social skill

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