Cognitive processing therapy versus supportive counseling for acute stress disorder following assault: A randomized pilot trial

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    Abstract

    The study tested the efficacy and tolerability of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) for survivors of assault with acute stress disorder. Participants (N=30) were randomly allocated to CPT or supportive counseling. Therapy comprised six individual weekly sessions of 90-min duration. Independent diagnostic assessment for PTSD was conducted at posttreatment. Participants completed self-report measures of posttraumatic stress, depression, and negative trauma-related beliefs at pre-, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up. Results indicated that both interventions were successful in reducing symptoms at posttreatment with no statistical difference between the two; within and between-group effect sizes and the proportion of participants not meeting PTSD criteria was greater in CPT. Treatment gains were maintained for both groups at 6-month follow-up.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)825-836
    Number of pages12
    JournalBehavior Therapy
    Volume43
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

    Keywords

    • Acute stress disorder
    • Cognitive behavior therapy
    • Early intervention
    • Trauma

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