Collective Self-Determination: How the Agent of Help Promotes Pride, Well-Being, and Support for Intergroup Helping

Emma Thomas, Catherine Amiot, Winnifred Louis, Alice Goddard

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This research integrates self-determination theory and the social identity approach to investigate the notion of collective (group level) self-determination, and to test how the agent of intergroup help (helping initiated by a group representative versus group members) shapes group members’ motives and support for intergroup helping. Study 1 (N = 432) demonstrates that collective self-determination predicts support for intergroup helping, group pride, and well-being, over and above individual-level self-determined motivation. Study 2 (N = 216) confirmed that helping by group members was seen as more collectively self-determined than helping by a group representative, producing effects on pride, well-being, and support. Study 3 (N = 124) explores a qualifier of these effects: People who identify more strongly with the leader who is providing the help also experience representative helping as more collectively self-determined, thereby promoting well-being, group pride, and support. Findings highlight the value of integrating self-determination theory with intergroup theories to consider collective aspects of self-determination.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)662-677
    Number of pages16
    JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
    Volume43
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017

    Keywords

    • group pride
    • intergroup helping
    • leadership
    • self-determination
    • social identity
    • well-being

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