Communicative Interaction and Foreign Policy Change: Re-evaluating the Carter Administration’s Decision-Making Process during the Iranian Revolution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research on foreign policy tends to emphasize stability over change. Change is preferentially understood as an episodic phenomenon in foreign policy. When it does occur it is viewed as the result of a rationally planned change process. However, research carried out in organizational theory has come to accept that change is an emergent and continuous process. The emergent approach acknowledges change as the norm. According to this approach the mechanism catalyzing change is the communicative interaction process within an organization. In the current article, I apply an emergent change approach to identify the communicative interaction processes shaping the Carter Administration’s policy throughout the Iranian Revolution. In doing so, I claim that the Administration’s policy resulted from the cumulative and continuous policy adaptations and adjustments rather than from an episodic and planned break with previous policies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-118
Number of pages20
JournalPortuguese Journal of Political Science
Volume5
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • American Foreign Policy
  • Jimmy Carter
  • Policy change
  • Communicative Interactions
  • Emergent Change

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Communicative Interaction and Foreign Policy Change: Re-evaluating the Carter Administration’s Decision-Making Process during the Iranian Revolution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this