Community and social correlates of leisure activity participation among older adults

Wenbiao Zheng, Yunong Huang, Lei Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Except for social network and social support, little research was conducted to examine other social and community factors associated with older adults’ leisure activity participation. This research proposed three community and social factors of sense of community, trust and online social interaction and examined their relationships with leisure activity participation among older adults. It was based on a cross-sectional survey conducted in China in 2017. A total of 423 older adults completed the questionnaire. Regression analyses revealed that sense of community, trust and online social interaction were associated significantly with older adults’ overall leisure activity participation. Among eight individual categories of leisure activities, i.e. mass media, reading, social activities, outdoor activities, sports activities, spectator sports, cultural activities and hobbies, online social interaction was associated significantly with all categories except outdoor activities. Sense of community was associated significantly with all categories except cultural activities and hobbies. Trust was associated significantly with reading, cultural activities and hobbies. The findings highlight the impacts of community and social factors on older adults’ leisure activity participation. The findings also suggest different ways to enhance older adults’ leisure activity participation through promoting their sense of community, trust and online social interaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)688-702
Number of pages15
JournalLeisure Studies
Volume41
Issue number5
Early online date22 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Leisure activity participation
  • online social interaction
  • sense of community
  • trust

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