Comparability of the Australian National Cancer Symptom Trials (CST) Group's Study Populations to National Referrals to Non-CST Specialist Palliative Care Services Participating in the Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration

Hiromichi Matsuoka, Samuel Allingham, Belinda Fazekas, Linda Brown, Zac Vandersman, Katherine Clark, Meera R. Agar, David C. Currow

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction
Using the results of Phase III studies in clinical practice depends on how representative study participants are of the clinical population to whom the results will be applied. The closer the characteristics between the subgroup who participate in a clinical trial and the whole population, the easier it is for clinicians to apply the results directly to the patient that he/she is treating. Trial participation is generally more happenstance than a systematic sampling of a population and is limited by eligibility criteria that do not reflect the entire clinical population
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e9-e14
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Under a Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND

Keywords

  • comorbidities
  • palliative care
  • Phase IV postmarketing studies

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