Comparing a Passive-Elastic and a Powered Prosthesis in Transtibial Amputees

Chiara Mancinelli, Benjamin Patritti, Peppino Tropea, Richard Greenwald, Rick Casler, Hugh Herr, Paolo Bonato

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Passive-elastic foot prostheses cannot produce net work. Consequently, passive-elastic foot prostheses are limited in their ability to enable a biologically-realistic gait pattern in transtibial amputees. This shortcoming results in difficulties in balance and walking and leads to high levels of oxygen consumption during locomotion. A powered prosthesis has the potential for overcoming these problems and allowing transtibial amputees to achieve a biologically-realistic gait pattern. In this study, we compared the effects of the Ceterus by ssur, a traditional passive-elastic prosthesis, with those of the PowerFoot Biom (iWalk, Cambridge, MA), a recently-developed powered prosthesis. Gait biomechanics and metabolic cost were compared in a group of 5 transtibial amputees during level-ground walking. The results provided preliminary evidence that the use of a powered prosthesis leads to a decrease in the level of oxygen consumption during ambulation due to improvements in ankle kinematics and kinetics primarily during late stance. An average decrease in oxygen consumption of 8.4% was observed during the study when subjects used the PowerFoot compared to the Ceterus. An average increase of 54% was observed in the peak ankle power generation during late stance. Our results suggest that powered prostheses have the potential for significantly improving ambulation in transtibial amputees.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages8255-8258
    Number of pages4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 26 Dec 2011
    Event33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS -
    Duration: 30 Aug 2011 → …

    Conference

    Conference33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS
    Period30/08/11 → …

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