Comparison of automated classification techniques for predicting benthic biological communities using hydroacoustics and video observations

D Ierodiaconou, J Monk, A Rattray, L Laurenson, V Versace

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    91 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effective management of our marine ecosystems requires the capability to identify, characterise and predict the distribution of benthic biological communities within the overall seascape architecture. The rapid expansion of seabed mapping studies has seen an increase in the application of automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, and the need of techniques to assess confidence of model outputs. We use towed video observations and 11 seafloor complexity variables derived from multibeam echosounder (MBES) bathymetry and backscatter to predict the distribution of 8 dominant benthic biological communities in a 54km2 site, off the central coast of Victoria, Australia. The same training and evaluation datasets were used to compare the accuracies of a Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC) and two new generation decision tree methods, QUEST (Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree) and CRUISE (Classification Rule with Unbiased Interaction Selection and Estimation), for predicting dominant biological communities. The QUEST classifier produced significantly better results than CRUISE and MLC model runs, with an overall accuracy of 80% (Kappa 0.75). We found that the level of accuracy with the size of training set varies for different algorithms. The QUEST results generally increased in a linear fashion, CRUISE performed well with smaller training data sets, and MLC performed least favourably overall, generating anomalous results with changes to training size. We also demonstrate how predicted habitat maps can provide insights into habitat spatial complexity on the continental shelf. Significant variation between patch-size and habitat types and significant correlations between patch size and depth were also observed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)S28-S38
    Number of pages11
    JournalContinental Shelf Research
    Volume31
    Issue number2 SUPPL.
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 15 Feb 2011

    Keywords

    • Automated classification
    • Benthic habitat mapping
    • Multibeam echosounder
    • Towed video

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of automated classification techniques for predicting benthic biological communities using hydroacoustics and video observations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this