Comparison of ferric carboxymaltose and iron polymaltose efficacy in renal anaemia

Glen Allen, Paul Hakendorf, Ann Kruger, Anne Arnold, Jeffrey Barbara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Thirty chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients were retrospectively analysed at the Flinders Medical Centre, having received both iron polymaltose (IP) and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) iron infusion therapies using an established iron dosing protocol for renal anaemia in CKD. The dose of iron was 500 mg administered intravenously. Fourteen of these patients received Darbepoetin alfa during the first period of iron repletion with IP while 18 of these patients received Darbepoetin during FCM dosage. The incidence of side effects with both infusate therapies was monitored. During the first study period these patients received IP infusions. At the outset, the mean haemoglobin was 107 g/L, ferritin 101.3 ug/L and Tsat 12.4%. Following IP infusion, the mean haemoglobin increased significantly to 114.4 g/L (p=0.002), ferritin to 291 ug/L (p<0.0001) and Tsat to 20.7% (p<0.0001). In the later study period, FCM was used as the iron infusate of choice. Prior to FCM therapy the mean baseline haemoglobin was 106.2 g/L, ferritin 151.2 ug/L and Tsat 15.4%, values which were not significantly different from the baseline readings in the IP group. Following FCM, mean haemoglobin increased significantly to 113.8 g/L (p=0.002), ferritin to 271.4 ug/L (p=0.0004) and Tsat to 19.1% (p=0.02). Similar outcomes were observed with each iron infusate regimen. Calculated eGFR was not significantly altered with either iron treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-8
Number of pages5
JournalRenal Society of Australasia Journal
Volume14
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ferric carboxymaltose
  • Ferritin
  • Haemoglobin
  • Iron deficiency
  • Iron polymaltose

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