Consecutive Nights of Moderate Sleep Loss Does Not Affect Mood in Healthy Young Males

Christiana Harous, Gregory D. Roach, Thomas G. Kontou, Ashley J. Montero, Nicole Stuart, Charli Sargent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Sleep loss causes mood disturbance in non-clinical populations under severe conditions, i.e., two days/nights of sleep deprivation or a week of sleep restriction with 4–5 h in bed each night. However, the effects of more-common types of sleep loss on mood disturbance are not yet known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine mood disturbance in healthy adults over a week with nightly time in bed controlled at 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 h. Participants (n = 115) spent nine nights in the laboratory and were given either 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 h in bed over seven consecutive nights. Mood was assessed daily using the Profile of Mood States (POMS-2). Mixed-linear effects models examined the effect of time in bed on total mood disturbance and subscales of anger-hostility, confusion-bewilderment, depression-dejection, fatigue-inertia, tension-anxiety, vigour-activity and friendliness. There was no effect of time in bed on total mood disturbance (F(4, 110.42) = 1.31, p = 0.271) or any of the subscales except fatigue-inertia. Fatigue-inertia was higher in the 5 h compared with the 9 h time in bed condition (p = 0.012, d = 0.75). Consecutive nights of moderate sleep loss (i.e., 5–7 h) does not affect mood but does increase fatigue in healthy males.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)442-448
Number of pages7
JournalClocks & Sleep
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • emotion
  • fatigue
  • mood disturbance
  • profile of mood states
  • sleep restriction
  • wellbeing

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