“Context, content, and system” supporting digital health hub (DHH)–enabled models of care (MoCs) for fragility hip fractures: perspectives of diverse multidisciplinary stakeholders in South Australia from qualitative in-depth interviews

Lalit Yadav, Tiffany K. Gill, Anita Taylor, Jennifer de-Young, Renuka Visvanathan, Mellick J Chehade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Summary: Combining thematic analysis and a human–computer persuasive systems framework suggests that hip fracture recovery among older people can be enhanced through person-centered digital health hub models of care focused on behavior change education and integrated care. The findings intend to guide settings involving comorbid conditions and low- and middle-income countries in developing innovative digital health solutions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to understand stakeholders’ perspectives on the development of a digital health-enabled model of care for fragility hip fractures and to map out factors that could influence the design and implementation of such a model. Methods: Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with stakeholders from various clinical disciplines, allied health, and computer science. A hybrid process involving thematic analysis of the raw data using inductive coding was the first step. In the second step, the tenets of a theoretical framework (health behavior change supporting systems) were deductively applied to the thematic constructs generated as part of the first step of the analysis. Results: In total, 24 in-depth interviews were conducted with stakeholders. We identified 18 thematic constructs presented under the categories of context, content, and system. Context covered patient characteristics such as frailty, digital literacy, and patient or carer participation, whereas healthcare delivery aspects included the structure and culture of existing practice and the need for innovative holistic models of care. Content outlines the active ingredients and approach in developing a digital health hub, and it highlights the importance of targeted education and behavior change. The system is a complicated matrix crossing different aspects of healthcare and offering a value proposition design through personalization across modes of content delivery. This must foster trust, ensure adequate financing, and support ownership and privacy by establishing appropriate mechanisms for embedding change. Conclusion: The findings from this study provide insights around potential factors related to patients, community support, and healthcare delivery influencing the design and next-stage implementation of a digital health hub model of care for fragility hip fractures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number167
Number of pages15
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Digital health
  • Frailty
  • Hip fractures
  • Models of care
  • Multimorbidity
  • Qualitative method

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