Correction: Aboriginal artefacts on the continental shelf reveal ancient drowned cultural landscapes in northwest Australia (PLoS ONE (2020) 15:7 (e0233912) DOI: /10.1371/journal.pone.0233912)

Jonathan Benjamin, Michael O'Leary, Jo McDonald, Chelsea Wiseman, John McCarthy, Emma Beckett, Patrick Morrison, Francis Stankiewicz, Jerem Leach, Jorg Hacker, Paul Baggaley, Katarina Jerbić, Madeline Fowler, John Fairweather, Peter Jeffries, Sean Ulm, Geoff Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

29 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In 2019, the Deep History of Sea Country (DHSC) Project team found and published two submerged archaeological sites in Murujuga (Dampier Archipelago) Western Australia [1]. Following publication in 2020, a further discussion has ensued and was published in the journal Geoarchaeology by Ward et al [2], with a subsequent response to their critique published by Benjamin et al [3]. This coincided with the project team returning to Murujuga in 2022 to collect further field data and to confirm the nature and context of the two underwater archaeological sites located in the shallow coastal waters of the continental shelf ([4] in press). This notice seeks to update the PLOS ONE readership on the supplemental data underlying [1] now made available and open access; to provide additional methodological information; to address errors in the statistical analyses for Figs 7, 8 and 12; and to provide additional discussion of interpretations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0287490
Number of pages5
JournalPLoS One
Volume18
Issue number6 June
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2023

Keywords

  • northwest Australia
  • ancient drowned cultural landscapes
  • continental shelf
  • Aboriginal artefacts
  • paleoanthropology
  • archaeology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Correction: Aboriginal artefacts on the continental shelf reveal ancient drowned cultural landscapes in northwest Australia (PLoS ONE (2020) 15:7 (e0233912) DOI: /10.1371/journal.pone.0233912)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this