Cultural hybridity in conversion: an examination of “Hapkas” Christology as resistance and innovation in Drusilla Modjeska’s The Mountain

Steve Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This essay analyzes Christian witness, applying a post-colonial lens to Drusilla Modjeska's The Mountain to account for conversion and transformation in Papua New Guinea. A hapkas (half-caste) Christology of indigenous agency, communal transformation and hybridity is examined in dialogue with New Testament themes of genealogy, redemption as gift and Jesus as the new Adam. Jesus as "good man true" is placed in critical dialogue with masculine identity tropes in Melanesian anthropology. Jesus as ancestor gift of Canaanite descent is located in relation to scholarship that respects indigenous cultures as Old Testament and post-colonial theologies of revelation which affirm cultural hybridity and indigenous innovation in conversion across cultures. This hapkas Christology demonstrates how a received message of Christian mission is transformed in a crossing of cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-441
Number of pages26
JournalMission Studies
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Christology
  • ancestor
  • genealogy
  • Drusilla Modjeska
  • post-colonial
  • indigenous

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