Cyclogenesis in the deep ocean beneath Western Boundary Currents: A process-oriented numerical study

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A two-layer shallow-water equation model is applied to a flat-bottom ocean on the f plane to explore instability mechanisms in Western Boundary Current (WBC) that lead to the formation of strong cyclones in the deep ocean underneath. Findings reveal a tight coupling of surface meandering and deep cyclogenesis, in agreement with observational evidence. Barotropic cyclones develop in timescales of 5–10 days and attain swirl speeds of >50 cm/s (depends on initial strength of WBC) on a diameter of ∼100 km. Cyclogenesis is driven by advection of relative vorticity in the surface ocean and failure of the thermocline to respond rapidly enough to the associated sea level variations. Findings suggest that cyclogenesis and the associated strong abyssal flows (benthic storms) are ubiquitous features of WBCs and other frontal flows.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberC03001
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Oceans
    Volume110
    Issue numberC3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2005

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Cyclogenesis in the deep ocean beneath Western Boundary Currents: A process-oriented numerical study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this