Delivering smoking cessation support to disadvantaged groups: A qualitative study of the potential of community welfare organizations

Jamie Bryant, Billie Bonevski, Christine Paul, Jon O'Brien, Wendy Oakes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reaching disadvantaged groups for smoking cessation represents a significant challenge. Not-for-profit community service organizations (CSOs) represent a promising setting for the delivery of quit smoking support to disadvantaged smokers. However, their potential has not yet been explored. This qualitative study examined the acceptability of community service-delivered smoking cessation care. In-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with 8 managers, 35 staff and 32 clients of CSOs between December 2008 and March 2009 in New South Wales, Australia. Discussions were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis techniques. Quantitative surveys were also conducted to explore preferences for cessation support. Results showed that the acceptability of providing and receiving cessation support in the community service setting was high. Staff perceived the provision of quit support to be compatible with their role but reported barriers to providing care including competing priorities, insufficient resources and inadequate staff training. Brief intervention approaches were preferred by managers and staff, while financial incentives and access to free or subsidized nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) were desired by clients. The community service setting represents a promising access point for engaging disadvantaged smokers for cessation and further research exploring the effectiveness of support delivered in this setting is clearly warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)979-990
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

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