Developing an Evidence Base for Violent and Disablist Hate Crime in Britain: Findings From the Life Opportunities Survey

Eric Emerson, Alan Roulstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the context of there being little robust U.K. data on disabled people’s exposure to violent crime and hate crime, we examined self-reported rates of exposure over the preceding 12 months to violent crime, hate crime, and disablist hate crime in a newly established survey, the U.K.’s Life Opportunities Survey. Information was collected from a nationally representative sample of 37,513 British adults (age 16 or older). Results indicated that (a) disabled adults were significantly more likely to have been exposed over the previous 12 months to violent crime (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.08, 2.61]) and hate crime (adjusted OR = 2.58, 95% CI = [2.17, 3.07]) than their non-disabled peers, (b) the differential risk of exposure to violent crime was particularly elevated among disabled adults with mental health problems (adjusted OR = 6.26, 95% CI = [5.01, 7.82]), (c) the differential risk of exposure to hate crime was particularly elevated among disabled adults with mental health problems (adjusted OR = 10.70, 95% CI = [7.91, 14.47]) or cognitive impairments (adjusted OR = 6.66, 95% CI = [3.95, 11.22]), and (d) these effects were strongly moderated by poverty status with no increase in differential risk of exposure for disabled adults among more wealthy respondents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3086-3104
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
Volume29
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Alan Roulstone is Professor of Disability Studies, University of Leeds and has written widely on disabling barriers and disability policy over a 25-year period. He has completed a range of major studies funded by the Leverhulme Trust, ESRC, UK Department of Health, Equality and Human Rights Commission and the Social Care Institute for Excellence. He has worked with key policy, practice, and disabled people’s organizations and has helped shape a range of disability-related policies.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2014.

Copyright:
Copyright 2015 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • disability
  • hate crime
  • violent crime

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