Differences between treatment seekers in an obese population: Medical intervention vs. dietary restriction

Melinda L. Higgs, Tracey Wade, Mark Cescato, Michelle Atchison, Anthony Slavotinek, Bruce Higgins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined two groups of people who were pursuing treatment for obesity: either medical intervention (a hospital group; N = 20) or support for dietary restriction (a community group; N = 18). This study addressed four questions: (1) Were there differences between the two groups in terms of their psychological distress (as measured by the Symptom Checklist)? (2) Does binge eating moderate psychological distress? (3) Do feelings of ineffectiveness moderate psychological distress? and (4) Which variables best accounted for group membership (i.e., type of treatment sought)? Results suggested that the hospital group was significantly more distressed than the community group. However, there were no differences between the two groups with respect to binge eating or feelings of ineffectiveness. These findings suggest that it is the effects of morbid obesity that are most likely to moderate psychological distress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-406
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Nov 1997
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Binge eating
  • Obesity
  • Psychological distress
  • Treatment seekers

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