Differences in the degree of respiratory and peripheral muscle impairment are evident on clinical, electrophysiological and biopsy testing in critically ill adults a qualitative systematic review

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    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients are exposed to a combination of insults that affect both respiratory and peripheral skeletal muscle function. However, different muscle groups may not be affected to the same extent by a prolonged critical illness. OBJECTIVE: To review original observational studies that measured an aspect of respiratory and peripheral muscle function in adults in the intensive care setting. DESIGN: Systematic review strategy and qualitative data synthesis. DATA SOURCES AND REVIEW METHODS: Four major citation databases were searched. Search terms included intensive care, critical care, diaphragm, quadriceps, and skeletal, respiratory and limb muscle. Titles and abstracts were reviewed to identify studies that measured both respiratory and peripheral muscle function. Reference lists of suitable publications were screened. Studies sampling critically ill patients with a neurological condition were excluded. RESULTS: 1119 items were identified, and 19 full-text/ abstract publications were reviewed. Ten studies investigated patients with a critical illness-related neuromuscular disorder. Nine studies targeted septic patients with multiple organ failure or patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. Clinical, electrophysiological and muscle biopsy specimen data were collected at different time-points and milestones relating to alertness, weaning criteria, respiratory support reduction and extubation. CONCLUSIONS: Currently available bedside methods of measuring respiratory and peripheral muscle function in critically ill patients are somewhat inadequate. Yet there is evidence suggesting that respiratory muscles may be relatively spared from the damage that can occur as a result of immobility, prolonged mechanical ventilation and systemic inflammation in critical illness.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)111-120
    Number of pages10
    JournalCritical Care and Resuscitation
    Volume12
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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