Dimensions of interpersonal relation among australian children and implications for psychological well-being

Ken Rigby, Phillip T. Slee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

308 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three dimensions of interpersonal relations among Australian school children were hypothesized as reflecting tendencies (a) to bully others, (b) to be victimized by others, and (c) to relate to others in a prosocial and cooperative manner. School children from two secondary schools (School A, n = 285; School B, n = 877) answered 20 questions assessing styles of interpersonal relations. Factor analyses of the item scores obtained from each of the two schools provided highly similar results, supporting the factorial independence of the three hypothesized dimensions. Students attending School B answered additional questions to assess self-esteem, level of happiness, and liking for school. Generally low levels of self-esteem were found among children who reported being more victimized than others, and high self-esteem among children practicing more prosocial behavior. The tendency to bully others was correlated negatively with happiness and liking school, but no relationship was found between this variable and self-esteem.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-42
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
Volume133
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1993

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