Disrupted attentional learning in high schizotypy: Evidence of aberrant salience.

Mark Haselgrove, Michael E. Le Pelley, Navreen Singh, Hui Teow, Richard Morris, Melissa Green, Oren Griffiths, Simon Killcross

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between learned variations in attention and schizotypy was examined in two experiments. In Experiment 1, participants low on a negative subscale of schizotypy exhibited an explicit bias in overt attention towards stimuli that were established as predictive of a trial outcome, relative to stimuli that were irrelevant. The same participants also showed a bias in learning about these stimuli when they presented in a novel context. Neither of these effects was observed in participants high in schizotypy. In Experiment 2, participants low on the negative subscale of schizotypy exhibited faster reaction times towards a target that was cued by a stimulus that had a history of predictive validity relative to a stimulus that had a history of irrelevance. Again, this effect was not present in participants high in schizotypy. These results imply a disruption in the normal allocation of attention to cues that have predictive significance in schizotypy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)601-624
Number of pages24
JournalBritish Journal of Psychology
Volume107
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    Haselgrove, M., Le Pelley, M. E., Singh, N., Teow, H., Morris, R., Green, M., Griffiths, O., & Killcross, S. (2016). Disrupted attentional learning in high schizotypy: Evidence of aberrant salience. British Journal of Psychology, 107(4), 601-624. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12175