Do age and language impairment affect speed of recognition for words with high and low closeness centrality within the phonological network?

Thuy Anh Sally Nguyen, Nichol Castro, Michael S. Vitevitch, Annabel Harding, Renata Teng, Joanne Arciuli, Cristian E. Leyton, Olivier Piguet, Kirrie J. Ballard

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Speed and accuracy of lexical access change with healthy ageing and neurodegeneration. While a word's immediate phonological neighbourhood density (i.e. words differing by a single phoneme) influences access, connectivity to all words in the phonological network (i.e. closeness centrality) may influence processing. This study aimed to investigate the effect of closeness centrality on speed and accuracy of lexical processing pre- and post- a single word-training session in healthy younger and older adults, and adults with logopenic primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA), which affects phonological processing. Method: Participants included 29 young and 17 older healthy controls, and 10 adults with lvPPA. Participants received one session of word-training on words with high or low closeness centrality, using a picture-word verification task. Changes in lexical decision reaction times (RT) and accuracy were measured. Result: Baseline RT was unaffected by age and accuracy was at ceiling for controls. Post-training, only young adults' RT were significantly faster. Adults with lvPPA were slower and less accurate than controls at baseline, with no training effect. Closeness centrality did not influence performance. Conclusion: Absence of training effect for older adults suggests higher threshold to induce priming, possibly associated with insufficient dosage or fatigue. Implications for word-finding interventions with older adults are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Early online date23 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • lexical decision
  • network science
  • phonology
  • primary progressive aphasia
  • word recognition

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Do age and language impairment affect speed of recognition for words with high and low closeness centrality within the phonological network?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this