Do clinicians ask pregnant women about exposures to tobacco and cannabis smoking, second-hand-smoke and E-cigarettes? An australian national cross-sectional survey

Gillian S. Gould, Yael Bar Zeev, Laura Tywman, Christopher Oldmeadow, Simon Chiu, Marilyn Clarke, Billie Bonevski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinicians often ask pregnant women about tobacco smoking, but their practices of asking about other smoking and nicotine exposures are unknown. This study analysed how often clinicians ask pregnant women about their use of e-cigarettes, cannabis, chewing tobacco, and second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure. Two cross-sectional surveys were undertaken. A random sample of 500 General Practitioner (GP) members were invited from the National Faculty of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (NFATSIH) to complete an on-line survey, and 5571 GP and Obstetrician (OBS) members of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) were sent a paper survey by mail. Questions on frequency of asking about the exposures used Likert Scales, later dichotomized to “often-always” and “never-sometimes”. Logistic regressions estimated associations between clinician type and asking about cannabis, e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco, and SHS. An adjusted model reduced potential confounders of location, guidelines, gender and population. n = 378 GPs and OBS participated (6.2% response). In total, 13–14% asked “often-always” about e-cigarettes; 58% cannabis; 38% cannabis with tobacco; 27% SHS, and 10% chewing tobacco—compared to 95% of the sample asking about cigarette smoking. After adjustment, the odds of RANZCOG GPs (OR 0.34) and OBS (OR 0.63) asking about cannabis were lower compared to NFATSIH GPs. Clinician type was non-significant for asking about e-cigarettes, chewing tobacco and SHS. Surveyed Australian GPs and obstetricians asked less frequently about e-cigarettes, chewing, SHS exposure, and cannabis, potentially missing important exposures for mother and child.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1585
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cannabis
  • Electronic cigarettes
  • Pregnancy
  • Smokeless tobacco
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco

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