Do Medications Commonly Prescribed to Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease Have an Effect on Nutritional Status? A Review of the Literature

Renee Fenton, Laura Brook-Barclay, Christopher L. Delaney, J. Ian Spark, Michelle D. Miller

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background Polypharmacy is common among patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with a combination of medications used for risk-factor modification and medical management of the disease itself. Interaction between commonly prescribed medications and nutritional status has not previously been well described. This review aims to critically appraise evidence exploring associations between medications commonly prescribed to patients with PAD and nutritional status and provide recommendations for practice. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to locate studies relating to nutrient interactions among lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, antiplatelet, and oral hypoglycemic drug classes. Quality of the evidence was rated on the basis of recommendations by the National Health and Medical Research Council. Results A total of 25 articles were identified as suitable and included in the review. No studies were specific to patients with PAD, and hence findings highlighting risk of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 [CoQ10]) depletion with lipid-lowering medications, zinc depletion with antihypertensive medications, and Vitamin B12 depletion with oral hypoglycemic medications are extrapolated from heterogeneous groups of patients and healthy adults. The body of evidence ranged in quality from satisfactory to poor. Conclusions High-quality research is required to confirm the interactions suggested by the included studies in patients with PAD specifically. It is, however, recommended that patients with PAD that are long-term consumers of the selected medications are monitored for CoQ10, zinc, and Vitamin B12 to facilitate early identification of deficiencies and initiation of treatment. Treatment may involve dietary intervention and/or supplementation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)145-175
    Number of pages31
    JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
    Volume32
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2016

    Keywords

    • Polypharmacy
    • Peripheral Arterial Disease
    • Nutritional Status
    • literature review

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