Does emotional intelligence play a role in teachers' likelihood of intervening in students' indirect bullying? A preliminary study

Rosalyn H. Shute, Eleni Didaskalou, Anna Dedousis-Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined whether emotional intelligence (EI) contributes to teachers' (N = 221) responses to vignettes portraying student peer conflicts characterizable as indirect bullying. They rated these vignettes (and others portraying direct bullying) on perceived seriousness, self-efficacy for intervening, and likelihood of intervening. EI was a positive predictor of seriousness of indirect bullying and self-efficacy, these two variables mediating the effect of EI on likelihood of intervening. However, the effect of EI was relatively small. Teachers also perceived indirect bullying as less serious than direct bullying, and felt less self-efficacious and less likely to intervene. Implications for teacher professional education are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103851
Number of pages8
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume119
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Emotional intelligence
  • Indirect bullying
  • Student conflict
  • Teacher professional education
  • Teacher self-efficacy

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