Dose–Response Effect of an Inertia Flywheel Postactivation Performance Enhancement Protocol on Countermovement Jump Performance

Keegan B. Hall, Maarten A. Immink, David T. Martin, Hunter Bennett, Robert G. Crowther

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose–response effect of a high-load, 6-repetition, maximum effort inertial flywheel (IFw) squat postactivation performance enhancement (PAPE) protocol on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance metrics. Thirteen subjects completed 5 squat testing sessions: 1 session to determine back-squat 6-repetition maximum, 1 session to determine 6-repetition maximum IFw load, and 3 sessions to investigate the dose–response effect of an IFw PAPE protocol set at the load determined in the second session. In the IFw PAPE sessions, subjects completed either 1, 2, or 3 sets of IFw squats, then performed 5 CMJs over 12 minutes (1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 min post-IFw). All CMJ tests were conducted on a force platform where CMJ performance outcomes and impulse variables were calculated. There was no main time or volume effect for jump height, contact time, reactive strength index, peak force, or any of the impulse variables. A main time effect was identified for flight time (P = .006, effect size = 0.24) and peak power (P = .001, effect size = 0.28). The lack of change in jump height may indicate that too much fatigue was generated following this near-maximal IFw squat protocol, thereby reducing the PAPE effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-154
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume40
Issue number2
Early online date4 Jan 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024

Keywords

  • eccentric
  • near-maximal
  • postactivation potentiation

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