Dying in the margins: Understanding palliative care and socioeconomic deprivation in the developed world

Joanne Lewis, Michelle DiGiacomo, David Currow

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    65 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Context: Individuals from low socioeconomic (SE) groups have less resources and poorer health outcomes. Understanding the nature of access to appropriate end-of-life care services for this group is important. Objectives: To evaluate the literature in the developed world for barriers to access for low SE groups. Methods: Electronic databases searched in the review included MEDLINE (1996-2010), CINAHL (1996-2010), PsychINFO (2000-2010), Cochrane Library (2010), and EMBASE (1996-2010). Publications were searched for key terms "socioeconomic disadvantage," "socioeconomic," "poverty," "poor" paired with "end-of-life care," "palliative care," "dying," and "terminal Illness." Articles were analyzed using existing descriptions for dimensions of access to health services, which include availability, affordability, acceptability, and geographical access. Results: A total of 67 articles were identified for the literature review. Literature describing end-of-life care and low SE status was limited. Findings from the review were summarized under the headings for dimensions of access. Conclusion: Low SE groups experience barriers to access in palliative care services. Identification and evaluation of interventions aimed at reducing this disparity is required.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)105-118
    Number of pages14
    JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
    Volume42
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

    Keywords

    • dimensions of access
    • end-of-life care
    • health literacy
    • palliative care
    • poor
    • provider-patient interaction
    • Socioeconomic deprivation

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