Effect of anti-inflammatory diets on inflammation markers in adult human populations: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CONTEXT: Chronic inflammation, characterized by prolonged elevated inflammation markers, is linked to several chronic conditions. Diet can influence the levels of inflammation markers in the body. 

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effects of anti-inflammatory diets on 14 different inflammation markers in adults. 

DATA SOURCES: This systematic review conducted searches using Medline, PubMed, EMCare, Cochrane, and CINAHL, to locate randomized controlled trials (RCTs). 

DATA EXTRACTION: Two researchers independently screened 1537 RCTs that measured changes in inflammation markers after prescription of an intervention diet. 

DATA ANALYSIS: In total, 20 RCTs were included and assessed qualitatively. The results demonstrated that a Mediterranean diet can bring about statistically significant and clinically meaningful between-group differences in interleukins -1α, -1β, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -10, and -18, interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, C-reactive protein, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, as compared with a control diet. 

CONCLUSIONS: There may be a link between diet, inflammation markers, and disease outcomes in various adult populations. However, further research using consistent RCT protocols is required to determine correlations between diet, specific inflammation markers, and clinically relevant outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-74
Number of pages20
JournalNutrition reviews
Volume81
Issue number1
Early online date13 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2023

Keywords

  • adult human populations
  • anti-inflammatory diet
  • inflammation markers
  • randomized controlled trials

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