Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea with cardiovascular disease

Emer Van Ryswyk, Craig S. Anderson, Ferran Barbe, Kelly A. Loffler, Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho, Yuanming Luo, Weiwei Quan, Jiguang Wang, Danni Zheng, R. Doug McEvoy

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

To the Editor: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is consistently associated with increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease (1), but the large-scale, international SAVE (Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Endpoints) randomized trial showed that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment did not prevent serious CV events in high-risk patients (2). One explanation is that SAVE showed a nonsignificant, <1.0 mm Hg systolic blood pressure (BP) difference between CPAP-treated and usual care (UC) groups over a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, which was smaller than expected based on short-term trials (3). To provide greater insight into the SAVE results, we wish to report further data on mean BP and visit-to-visit BP variability (BPV) across the first 24 months of the study. Although increasing evidence supports an association of BPV and CV events (4), the importance of this key BP parameter in relation to CPAP treatment for OSA is uncertain (5, 6). Some of these results have been presented in abstract form (7, 8).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1433-1435
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Volume199
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Sleep apnea
  • CPAP
  • blood pressure

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