Effects of a perindopril-based blood pressure lowering regimen on cardiac outcomes among patients with cerebrovascular disease

PROGRESS Collaborative Group, John Chalmers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To determine the effects of a perindopril-based blood pressure lowering regimen on major cardiac events among hypertensive and non-hypertensive patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease. Methods and results: A total of 6105 individuals with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack were randomly assigned active treatment (n=3051) or placebo (n=3054). Active treatment comprised the angiotensin-converting -enzyme inhibitor perindopril (4 mg daily), with the addition of the diuretic indapamide at the discretion of treating physicians. Over a mean of 3.9 years of follow-up, active treatment reduced blood pressure by 9/4 mmHg compared with placebo and reduced the primary outcome, stroke, by 28%. Major coronary events occurred in 269 participants (active 3.8%, placebo 5.0%) and heart failure was diagnosed in 264 participants (active 3.7%, placebo 4.9%). Active treatment reduced the risk of major coronary events by 26% (95% CI; 6-42%; p=0.02) and the risk of congestive heart failure by 26% (5-42%; p=0.02). For each of these outcomes, there was no clear evidence of differences between the treatment effects in participants classified as hypertensive or non-hypertensive, and those with or without a history of coronary heart disease. Conclusions: Among individuals with cerebrovascular disease, blood pressure lowering with a regimen involving perindopril and indapamide not only reduced the risk of stroke, but also substantially reduced the risks of cardiac outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)475-484
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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