Effects of salinity, pH and temperature on the re-establishment of bioluminescence and copper or SDS toxicity in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula using bioluminescence as an endpoint

Jaquelyn M. Craig, Paul L. Klerks, Kirsten Ruth Heimann, Juliann L. Waits

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pyrocystis lunulais a unicellular, marine, photoautotrophic, bioluminescent dinoflagellate .This organism is used in the Lumitox1bioassay with inhibition of bioluminescence re-establishment as the endpoint .Experiments determined if acute changes in pH, salinity, or temperature had an effect on the organisms’ ability to re-establish bioluminescence, or on the bioassay’s potential to detect sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and copper toxicity .The re-establishment of bioluminescence itself was not very sensitive to changes in pH within the pH 6–10 range, though reducing pH from 8 to levels below 6 decreased this capacity .Increasing the pH had little effect on Cu or SDS toxicity, but decreasing the pH below 7 virtually eliminated the toxicity of either compound in the bioassay .Lowering the salinity from 33 to 27%or less resulted in a substantial decrease in re-establishment of bioluminescence, while increasing the salinity to 43 or 48%resulted in a small decline .Salinity had little influence on the bioassay’s quantification of Cu toxicity, while the data showed a weak negative relationship between SDS toxicity and salinity .Re-establishment of bioluminescence showed a direct dependence on temperature, but only at 10ºC did temperature have an obvious effect on the toxicity of Cu in this bioassay.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-275
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume125
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Salinity
  • Bioluminescence
  • Toxicity

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