Electroactive Polyhydroquinone Coatings for Marine Fouling Prevention: A Rejected Dynamic pH Hypothesis and a Deceiving Artifact in Electrochemical Antifouling Testing

Mikael Larsson, Ali Yousefi, Sait Elmas, Johan Lindén, Thomas Nann, Magnus Nyden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanometer-thin coatings of polyhydroquinone (PHQ), which release and absorb protons upon oxidation and reduction, respectively, were tested for electrochemically induced anti-biofouling activity under the hypothesis that a dynamic pH environment would discourage fouling. Antifouling tests in artificial seawater using the marine, biofilm-forming bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus proved the coatings to be ineffective in fouling prevention but revealed a deceiving artifact from the reactive species generated at the counter electrode (CE), even for electrochemical bias potentials as low as |400| mV versus Ag|AgCl. These findings provide valuable information on the preparation of nanothin PHQ coatings and their electrochemical behavior in artificial seawater. The results further demonstrate that it is critical to isolate the CE in electrochemical anti-biofouling testing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4751-4759
Number of pages9
JournalACS Omega
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Marine biofouling
  • PHQ
  • dynamic pH environment
  • CE

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