Engagement, satisfaction, retention and behavioural outcomes of linguistically diverse mothers and infants participating in an Australian early obesity prevention trial

Sarah Marshall, Huilan Xu, Sarah Taki, Yvonne Laird, Penelope Love, Li Ming Wen, Chris Rissel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Early obesity prevention research interventions in Australia generally expect participants to be able to communicate in English, but do not account for other languages. This study aimed to investigate engagement, satisfaction, retention and behavioural outcomes of linguistically diverse participants from a mainstream early childhood obesity prevention trial.

Methods: Healthy Beginnings is a nurse-led intervention based in Sydney, supporting families with optimal infant feeding and active play via telephone. This secondary analysis assessed participant engagement in the nurse telephone calls (call completions), satisfaction and behavioural outcomes (6- and 12-month survey data) and retention (survey completions), in the first year of life according to participants’ language spoken at home (English or other language). 

Results: Of 1155 mothers, 533 (46%) spoke a language other than English at home. Significantly fewer mothers speaking a language other than English completed the 6-month survey (79%) compared to those speaking English (84%), yet mothers speaking a language other than English who completed the program were more satisfied with the program overall. Significantly fewer mothers speaking a language other than English completed the final four nurse calls (of six) (56%-65%) compared to those speaking English (70%-80%). Adjusted odds ratios showed selected behavioural outcomes were significantly more positive for participants speaking English at home.

Conclusions: Healthy Beginnings trial participants who spoke a language other than English at home had less favourable engagement, retention and behavioural outcomes compared to those who spoke English.

So what?

Early obesity prevention interventions should consider cultural adaptations to improve engagement and effectiveness among culturally and linguistically diverse families.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Promotion Journal of Australia
Early online date21 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • behaviour change
  • breast feeding
  • culturally and linguistically diverse people
  • health behaviours
  • nutrition

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