Estimating adolescent sleep patterns: parent reports versus adolescent self-report surveys, sleep diaries, and actigraphy

Michelle Short, Michael Gradisar, Leon Lack, Helen Wright, Alex Chatburn

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    64 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: In research and clinical contexts, parent reports are often used to gain information about the sleep patterns of their adolescents; however, the degree of concordance between parent reports and adolescent-derived measures is unclear. The present study compares parent estimates of adolescent sleep patterns with adolescent self-reports from surveys and sleep diaries, together with actigraphy. Methods: A total of 308 adolescents (59% male) aged 13-17 years completed a school sleep habits survey during class time at school, followed by a 7-day sleep diary and wrist actigraphy. Parents completed the Sleep, Medical, Education and Family History Survey. Results: Parents reported an idealized version of their adolescent's sleep, estimating signifi-cantly earlier bedtimes on both school nights and weekends, significantly later wake times on weekends, and significantly more sleep than either the adolescent self-reported survey, sleep diary, or actigraphic estimates. Conclusion: Parent reports indicate that the adolescent averages a near-optimal amount of sleep on school nights and a more than optimal amount of sleep on weekends. However, adolescent-derived averages indicate patterns of greater sleep restriction. These results illustrate the importance of using adolescent-derived estimates of sleep patterns in this age group and the importance of sleep education for both adolescents and their parents.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)23-26
    Number of pages4
    JournalNature and Science of Sleep
    Volume5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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