Evaluating the basis of the between-group production effect in recognition.

Alexander Taikh, Glen Bodner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reading a list of words aloud can improve recognition over silently reading them. This between-groups production effect (PE) cannot be due to relative distinctiveness because each group studies only 1 type of item. We tested 2 other possibilities. By a strategy account, a pure-aloud group might benefit from use of a production-based distinctiveness strategy at test (e.g., "Did I say this word aloud?"). By a strength account, aloud items may simply be more strongly encoded than silent items. To evaluate these accounts, we tested whether a between-group PE occurs when participants experience a salient within-group manipulation of font size, generation, or imagery at study. The answer was yes, except when imagery was the within-group task. This pattern, and aspects of participants' strategy reports, fit well with a strategy account if it is assumed that the imagery task led participants to abandon a production-based strategy. However, many of our findings were also compatible with an evaluated strength account if it is assumed that the imagery task led participants to abandon evaluating memory strength. In conjunction with recent findings, we suggest that multiple processes may contribute to the PE, and the relevant subset in play will differ as a function of study design, study task, and memory test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-194
Number of pages9
JournalCanadian Journal of Experimental Psychology-Revue Canadienne de Psychologie Experimentale
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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