Evaluation of a (pilot) stage-tailored brief smoking cessation intervention among hospital patients presenting to a hospital pre-admission clinic.

Chris Rissel, Allison Salmon, Ann-Maree Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the significant benefits of advising all smokers to quit, hospital patients who smoke do not systematically receive this advice. This study sought to determine the prevalence of smoking, attitudes of patients towards not smoking while in hospital, and the feasibility and effectiveness of a brief smoking cessation intervention in a pre-admission clinic context. Over 230 smokers received a brief smoking cessation intervention, while a control group (n = 114) received only a free Quit Kit. The age-standardised smoking prevalence was 19%; a further 3% of patients were recent quitters. Most smokers do not expect or experience problems with not smoking while in hospital. Brief smoking cessation advice tailored to stage-of-change by a health worker in a hospital pre-admission clinic significantly increased the quit rates for females.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-93
Number of pages11
JournalAustralian health review : a publication of the Australian Hospital Association
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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