Everyone is in damage control: The meanings and performance of family for second and third generation prisoners

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter draws on data from the Generations Through Prison project to explore the familial impacts of incarceration from the perspectives of second and third generation prisoners. Focusing on the intimate relations lost, ‘suspended’, or recreated, the chapter examines how intergenerational incarceration intensifies the pains of imprisonment. The argument here is that irrespective of the ties among those who serve time with immediate and/or extended family members, the deleterious effects of incarceration outweigh the positive dimensions. Further, for intergenerational prisoners serving time ‘on their own’ — that is, without the ‘dividend’ of extended or immediate family — the search for close ties remains key to coping with prison life. As shall be seen, most of the participants in this research had very few, if any, intimates in the community who supported them while incarcerated or who would offer support once released
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPrisons, Punishment, and the Family
Subtitle of host publicationTowards a New Sociology of Punishment?
EditorsRachel Condry, Peter Scharff Smith
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherOxford University Press
Chapter14
Pages213-229
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9780198810087
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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    Halsey, M. (2018). Everyone is in damage control: The meanings and performance of family for second and third generation prisoners. In R. Condry, & P. Scharff Smith (Eds.), Prisons, Punishment, and the Family: Towards a New Sociology of Punishment? (pp. 213-229). Oxford University Press.