Exploring effect of pain education on chronic pain patients' expectation of recovery and pain intensity

Manasi M. Mittinty, Simon Vanlint, Nigel Stocks, Murthy N. Mittinty, G. Lorimer Moseley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Chronic pain affects an estimated 1 in 10 adults globally regardless of age, gender, ethnicity, income or geography. Chronic pain, a multifactorial problem requires multiple interventions. One intervention which demonstrates promising results to patient reported outcomes is pain education. However, patient perspective on pain education and its impact remains fairly unknown. A cross-sectional study involving individuals with chronic pain examined their perspectives on pain education; did it change their understanding about their pain and self-management and did it have any impact on their perceived pain intensity and recovery.

Methods: The study complied with CHERRIES guidelines and the protocol was locked prior to data collection. Primary outcomes were pain intensity and participants’ expectation of recovery. Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to analyze the data.

Results: Five hundred and seventy three people participated; full data sets were available for 465. Participants who observed changes in their pain cognition and self-management following pain education reported lower pain intensity and greater expectation of recovery than participants who did not observe changes to cognition and management 

Conclusions: The results suggest that individuals who observed changes to pain cognition and self-management on receiving pain education reported lower pain intensity and higher expectations of recovery than their counterparts who did not perceive any changes to pain cognition and self-management.

Implications: Pain intensity and expectations about recovery are primary considerations for people in pain. What influences these factors is not fully understood, but education about pain is potentially important. The results suggest that individuals who observed changes to pain cognition and self-management on receiving pain education reported lower pain intensity and higher expectations of recovery than their counterparts who did not perceive any changes to pain cognition and self-management. The results from this study highlight the importance of effective pain education focused on reconceptualization of pain and its management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-219
Number of pages9
JournalScandinavian Journal of Pain
Volume18
Issue number2
Early online date19 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Apr 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • pain cognition
  • pain education
  • pain intensity
  • perceived recovery
  • self-management of pain

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