Exploring perceptions about the feasibility of educational video resources as a strategy to support parental involvement in youth soccer

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Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore parents’ and coaches’ perceptions about educational video resources to support parents’ involvement in youth soccer. Design: Using an instrumental, qualitative case study design, 21 parents and coaches were recruited to participate in an individual interview. All participants were involved in one of the developmental stages of youth sport participation (sampling, specialising or investment years) in soccer in South Australia. Elicitation tools were used in the individual interviews in the form of educational video resources designed for parents involved in youth soccer to prompt dialogue. All interview data was analysed thematically. Results: Three main themes were developed from the thematic analysis, including ‘Importance of targeted curriculum’, ‘Integrated delivery model’ and ‘Strategies to maximise impact’ of video-based parent education. Overall, parents and coaches perceive educational video resources as a promising addition to broader strategies aimed at enhancing parental involvement in youth soccer. Conclusions: The findings highlight parents’ and coaches’ perceptions about the potential utility of educational video resources as a tool to communicate, support and educate parents involved in youth soccer. However, the findings also highlight the need to consider how such an approach can be optimised, tailored, and supported within a broader intervention strategy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101730
JournalPsychology of Sport and Exercise
Volume50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • educational video resources
  • exploring perceptions
  • support parental involvement
  • youth soccer

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