Fear of falling and its association with anxiety and depression disorders among community-dwelling older adults

Tayebeh Rakhshani, Mina Hojat Ansari, Mehregan Ebrahimi, Mohammad Reza Ebrahimi, Sarah Kim Pearson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There has been a growing interest in assessing the condition and quality of life in older adult population, and factors contributing to it. In this context, fear of falling syndrome is introduced as one of the main factors that can affect the quality of life in the general adult population. However, little is known about the relationship between fear of falling and other disorders in older adults, particularly among the Middle East population. Here we investigated the associations between fear of falling and anxiety and depression disorders. A standardized questionnaire was used to assess sociodemographic variables and physical health condition. Subsequently, fear of falling and anxiety and depression scales were assessed using the Falls Efficacy Scale International and the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, respectively. Our results highlighted the high risk of having anxiety and depression disorders among older adults. The findings also indicate that physical and mental health disorders play a significant role in incident fear of falling. Therefore, improving mental health might lend controlling fear of falling syndrome, which then preventing falls incident and subsequent injury in older adult population.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)303-315
    Number of pages13
    JournalInternational Journal of Health Promotion and Education
    Volume57
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2019

    Keywords

    • anxiety and depression
    • Fear of falling
    • mental health
    • older adult population
    • physical health

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