First Nations people often take on the ‘cultural load’ in their workplaces. Employers need to ease this burden

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Abstract

It’s good practice for employers to consult staff when forming policies or guidelines. However, for some staff from diverse backgrounds, this creates extra work and pressure.

“Cultural load” in the context of the workplace is the invisible workload employers knowingly or unknowingly place on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees to provide Indigenous knowledge, education and support. This is often done without any formally agreed reduction or alteration to their workload.

Consultation and transparency around policies which relate to and impact on First Nations voices is essential for reconciliation. However this should be built on reciprocity and respect, and not create additional staff burden or burnout.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages4
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2023

Keywords

  • Racism
  • Indigenous health
  • Cultural ties
  • First Nations people

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